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Welcome to Rethinking Hell!
Our position in the Evangelical debate on Hell is that of Conditional Immortality, which holds that believers will receive the reward of immortality, while others will finally be destroyed (annihilated).

Rethinking Hell contributor Chris Date interviews conditionalist Michael Zwaagstra on a course he recently taught at Steinbach Bible College on the three Christian views of hell.

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Joseph Dear

A Word About Life: The Zóé Vs. Bios Canard

It is no secret that traditionalists and conditionalists often disagree on what to make of the language of life and death in the Bible when it is applied to eternal destinies. Romans 6:23 paints this contrast well:

Joseph Dear

John 17:3 Does Not Change The Meaning of “Eternal Life”

It should be apparent why evangelical conditionalists appeal to passages that use the term “eternal life.” The Bible only attributes the fate of eternal life (or life in general) to the redeemed, in contrast to death for the unsaved (e.g. Romans 6:23). At face value, the phrase “eternal life” would mean life that lasts for eternity. If only the saved inherit life that lasts for eternity, then the wicked do not live forever. And therefore, the wicked cannot be tormented forever. For that reason, traditionalism requires that the life and death language in the Bible be metaphorical whenever it is applied to final judgment.

Joseph Dear

The Eternal Joys of The Life To Come Do Not Change The Meaning of “Life”

As many readers will likely be familiar with, one of the main questions in the debate over the nature and duration of hell is what is meant by the term “life” in the Bible when it speaks of the fate of the saved. 1 For more on the broader debate about the language of life and death as applied to final judgment, see “Introduction to Evangelical Conditionalism: Life and Death in the Bible” Part 1, Part 2, and Part 3. Many conditionalists, of course, are happy to take such language at face value. But face value is not always correct, whether in regards to the Bible or in life, and so traditionalists often argue that there are good reasons to interpret such language differently. 2Regarding the matter of reading scripture at face value, see “Traditionalism and Annihilationism in Light of the Face Value Meaning of Scripture”. 1. ↑ For more on the broader debate about the language of life and death as applied to final judgment, see “Introduction to Evangelical Conditionalism: Life and Death in the Bible” Part 1, Part 2, and Part 3. 2. ↑ Regarding the matter of reading scripture at face value, see “Traditionalism and Annihilationism in Light




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